Women of Cincy is a social enterprise built to celebrate Cincinnati’s incredible women, creating empathy and opportunities through storytelling, collaboration, community, and mentorship. We work within the community to employ, empower, and elevate local women of all backgrounds, colors, shapes, and abilities. 

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We’re afraid to be vulnerable with our stories because they get made fun of, they get caricatured. The people of the Midwest can easily be dismissed as a bunch of hillbillies, farmers, rednecks that care about God, country, and guns. But it’s a lot more nuanced than that when you hear the stories of the people, when you see their vision for the common good, and there’s lots of opportunities to engage those stories and find common ground.
— Abigail Murrish, Our Midwestern Life Podcast

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I will never forget it: I walked down to my bank in the rain, because I didn’t have a car, and I bought that ticket. I just deposited $3 in quarters. I was like, wow. I kept praying, “If this is meant to be just make a way; I don’t care what the way is.” When the way appeared, it was like, you’ve got to walk in the rain, girl.
— Lauren Elise

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Everywhere I looked I saw how I wanted to live, how I wanted to eat. That’s when I started putting all the pieces of the puzzle together. These systems were producing “good food that’s good for people,” and it was really integrated into the community. It felt genuine, and it was something that made sense for me.
— Annie Woods, Dark Wood Farm
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These kids are the most powerful human beings ever created. They are resilient and brave. They are beautiful and complicated. To have gone through some of their experiences and emerge from them with a strong and hopeful spirit is incredible.
— Katie Nzekwu, Villedge
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You know what? That’s what’s really holding me back. I’m afraid of not only failing, but I’m afraid of losing my identity as someone that has been well-accomplished. I’m earning great money. I’m supporting my family. People look at me a certain way, and I’m afraid I’m gonna lose that identity if I go do this and I fail.
— Kelly Dolan, Thrive Urban Impact Sourcing
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I have learned that I can’t be Superwoman all the time. I have to take off my cape sometimes and just relax.
— Shanequa Johnson, Barcode Glam
 
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I think I’ve become more aware. Sometimes in my circle of friends, we’ll say we’re “the only.” So whether it’s you’re the only woman, or you’re the only African-American, or you’re the only African-American woman in the room, it happens quite often.
— Kiana Trabue
 
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I wanted my son to know that he should never let fear hold him back. Even if my business were to fail, which it’s not, but even if it were, that he would know that Mommy went for her dream.
— Jenna Shaifer